Six Years On

Albion Water has now been providing waste water services to the residents of Knowle Village for over six years.  At the outset of the process to provide a secure, public sewerage service we promised that we would efficiently manage the sewerage assets, facilitate highways adoption, improve treatment resilience, minimise our carbon footprint and enhance biodiversity.

Not only have we succeeded in this ambition, but this has been achieved whilst also keeping average household bills below those originally predicted and below those that would have been charged had Southern Water served the site.

In addition to these savings, some non-financial examples of our achievements are summarised below:

Landscape feature planning – since taking over the sewage treatment works Albion has planted a new hedgerow composed of native shrubs and it has also planted native trees that will provide a striking feature for future generations to enjoy.  We plan to plant a selection of fruit trees for screening, implement a new conservation mowing regime and we have also been working hard to secure the continued survival of a field maple that could date back to the reign of Queen Anne, 300 years ago.  Attempts to take cuttings have so far failed, but it is our intention to secure a new generation from this veteran tree and to use it in further hedgerow planting.  

Research into wetland treatment – working with Cranfield University and various independent ecologists Albion has been able to show the benefits of nutrient removal by natural wetland treatment.  As well as producing great water quality results it also produces a high soil invertebrates biomass – this means that there are lots of insects (including many rare or specialist ones) that provide a source of food for a thriving population of reptiles and amphibians (7 species), bats (7+ species) and birds (including waders, thrushes and owls).

Habitat variety – wherever possible, land in Albion’s ownership or stewardship is managed to promote biodiversity.  For example, bare embankments are created to support threatened species of bees and wasps and work has been carried out to provide hibernation sites for bats and reptiles.

More generally – improved monitoring of our activities has allowed us to reduce energy use, to ensure discharges are as clean as possible and to check the impact of rainfall and groundwater levels - helping us to protect your homes as well as our assets and operations (including when almost one metre of rain fell in the area over the winter period!).